New & Noted

July 2021

Fiction

Instructor
by Beth Follett
Breakwater Books
$22.95  294 pages

“In the hour between wolf and dog – when a line of black thread held up to the horizon will distinguish itself to the human eye – Ydessa Bloom’s husband, an experienced pilot, away in the north country on a fishing trip, plummets into a lake called Baptiste.”

 

Non-Fiction

Rough Justice: Policing Crime, and the Origins of the Newfoundland Constabulary, 1729 – 1871
by Keith Mercer, Foreword by Edward Roberts
Flanker Press Ltd
$39.95  518 pages

“Turning conventional wisdom on its head, this book focuses squarely on the constables and contends that rather than peripheral figures, they were vital to the court system and to their communities. For the most part they were part-time policemen, untrained and unsalaried, but without them the courts could not have functioned. These early policemen also suffered rough justice from their critics.”

Future Possible: An Art History of Newfoundland and Labrador
by Mireille Eagan and many guest contributors
The Rooms / Goose Lane Editions
$60.00  310 pages

“The pages of this book offer plenty of images that serve our reverence for the past. Anyone familiar with Newfoundland and Labrador can flip through it and find a version that comforts and consoles. But maybe the same images can help us find clues to a place we don’t recognize at all.”

–Jamie Fitzpatrick, “The Great Leap Forward”

 

Children’s Books

Hare B&B
by Bill Richardson, illustrated by Bill Pechet
Running the Goat, Books & Broadsides Inc
$22.95. 72 pages, with 49 colour illustrations

“Her name was Harriet, but everyone called her Harry. Harry was an only child. Then, unexpectedly, her mother had identical septuplets.”

 

Kimmy & Mike
by Dave Paddon, illustrated by Lily Snowden-Fine
Running the Goat, Books & Broadsides Inc
$12.95  32 pages, with 9 full page and 13 small colour illustrations

“It has often been said, and I can’t disagree, / That there’s no one as tough as our folk of the sea. / But wo of the toughest, if the rights was known. / Were Kimmy and Mike, who lived in Belloram.”

 

 

 

 

Personal soundtrack- A chat with Jamie Fitzpatrick

BY Rebecca Cohoe

“When you’re young, you use music to invent yourself.” So said Jamie Fitzpatrick when I spoke with him about his second novel, The End of Music. Throughout the story, popular songs, from old standards to indie rock, shape the world of his characters. Our conversation ranged from his hometown of Gander to whether or not it is wrong to make your children listen to The Eagles in the car.

Yanksgiving in Newfoundland

BY Emily Deming

“No one insists on the crudité platter every year because they love raw vegetables. We are insisting on our place at the table; on being recognized for what we believe we are within our family, within our group of friends, within our community.”