Community Culture POL

September 2017

Portraits of Labrador | Photo by Effie Roberts | Mike Voisey

“I started making things on my own for extra money and the love of working with my hands. Now I make things out of wood, Labradorite, granite, Anorthosite, and soap stone. I was born in Happy Valley-Goose Bay in 1947. Growing up, I watched my mother use traditional methods and materials to make hats, coats, mittens, slippers, boots, and other clothing to meet our family’s needs. She often used seal and caribou hide and fur to make clothing for all seasons. Years later, I now use many of the same traditional Labrador methods to create my wears. I have been in business since 2006, and I use the skills my mother taught me to highlight Labrador traditions.

 

Portraits of Labrador | Photo by Effie Roberts | Ruth Voisey

“I love being a people person, and I love my church. My church family is particularly important to me. I love going to public places like the Aboriginal Family Resource Centre, the Arts and Culture Centre, and to take in some of the many sports events in our small town.

“Before I retired, I worked as a Laboratory Assistant at the hospital. I worked there for nearly 30 years. I loved my job, the work, and caring for patients. I learned something new everyday!”

“Home is Where the Heart Feels”

BY NQ

“They’re all looking forward, making plans for their future. Some are in school, working, or both. Sometimes they’re the sole breadwinner in their family. They all have these underlying pressures that most of us have been sheltered from.”

NORTHERN DETACHMENT

BY Clancy Margaret

The wind was still, but the cold was biting all the same. Stepping outside made her sinuses burn and her eyes water. She brushed the snow off the seat of her snowmobile—a mid-nineties Ski-Doo, always giving her trouble. She surveyed the town as she waited for the engine to warm up. It’s squat vinyl sided homes glowed amidst the dim winter daytime. Snowmobile tracks crisscrossed on the road but not a person was in sight. She checked her handheld GPS. The coordinates lined up with somewhere northwest, about a forty-five minute ride under the blanket of dark. There were no stars today. It was always cloudy.